13th May 2014 – Fun-Filled Drama

There are three positions our palms take when we speak to people. First, our palms face upwards. We do this when we politely ask for something. Remember to use this in your sales pitch! Second, our palms face downwards. This is a no-nonsense authoritative command, appropriate to use in emergencies. Lastly, we curl our fingers into a fist leaving our index finger pointing. This is a condescending gesture and is never appropriate to use on anyone. Reuben taught us practical skills to have through his Competent Communication 5 speech.

When people age, we can trace the arduous journeys of their lives through their face crinkles. We see the wisdom they’ve gained over the years through the twinkles in their eyes. Everyday we see our aged friends and family members reminds us that they are survivors. They continue to fight as life chews them up and spits them out again and again. Our turn will inevitably come. Ling Ling’s Competent Communication 6 speech is a reminder to us that living is a miracle and we must enjoy each miracle of a day to its zenith.

Ling nicely backed up his Competent Communication 7 speech with informative research. The ‘big bang’ started it all and now as stars explode turning energy into particles such as protons and electrons, hydrogen through a series of chemical reactions. These reactions constituted and formed other elements one at a time such as carbon and nickel. These are life’s lego pieces. We are remnants of dead stars and as dying stars emit energy, life on earth uses this energy to grow and prosper. The next time we look up to the skies and sing ‘twinkle twinkle little star’, we must thank our lucky stars!

Well done, Zainal for such an entertaining drama! As Zainal practiced his interpretive reading, he distinctly expressed two drastically different personalities. Through the eyes of over-enthusiastic Poppy and seemingly trodden-down Scott, who knew driving lessons could be filled with so much zest. It was an entertaining journey as the two explored life dilemmas from easily losing one’s focus, to living with poor education systems, and to managing difficult parental relationships. Nicely done, Zainal!

Our meeting roles were proficiently conducted as Lowell systematically counted our ‘ahs’ and ‘ums’ and tested our listening skills, Chris Ng kept time like a metronome, and Chris Woo and our speech evaluators highlighted our strengths and skills to improve elegantly. Seng Yee had a blast being our Toastmaster of the Evening for the first time. It was a well-organized meeting, segments ran timely, and we enjoyed a pleasant meeting. Thanks, everyone!

Regards,
Hazwan